Review Article

Surveillance of antimicrobial resistance in human health in Tanzania: 2016–2021

Neema Camara, Nyambura Moremi, Janneth Mghamba, Eliudi Eliakimu, Edwin Shumba, Pascale Ondoa, Beverly Egyir
African Journal of Laboratory Medicine | Vol 12, No 1 | a2053 | DOI: https://doi.org/10.4102/ajlm.v12i1.2053 | © 2023 Neema Camara, Nyambura Moremi, Janneth Mghamba, Eliudi Eliakimu, Edwin Shumba, Pascale Ondoa, Beverly Egyir | This work is licensed under CC Attribution 4.0
Submitted: 08 August 2022 | Published: 22 May 2023

About the author(s)

Neema Camara, Epidemiology and Disease Control Section, Ministry of Health, Dodoma, United Republic of Tanzania
Nyambura Moremi, Department of Bacteriology, National Public Health Laboratory, Dar es Salaam, United Republic of Tanzania
Janneth Mghamba, Epidemiology and Disease Control Section, Ministry of Health, Dodoma, United Republic of Tanzania
Eliudi Eliakimu, Health Quality Assurance Unit, Ministry of Health, Dodoma, United Republic of Tanzania
Edwin Shumba, African Society for Laboratory Medicine, Addis Ababa, Ethiopia
Pascale Ondoa, African Society for Laboratory Medicine, Addis Ababa, Ethiopia
Beverly Egyir, Department of Bacteriology, Noguchi Memorial Institute for Medical Research, College of Health Sciences, University of Ghana, Legon, Ghana

Abstract

Background: Antimicrobial resistance (AMR) surveillance plays an important role in early detection of resistant strains of pathogens and informs treatments decisions at local, regional and national levels. In 2017, Tanzania developed a One Health AMR Surveillance Framework to guide establishment of AMR surveillance systems in the human and animal sectors.

Aim: We reviewed AMR surveillance studies in Tanzania to document progress towards establishing an AMR surveillance system and determine effective strengthening strategies.

Methods: We conducted a literature review on AMR studies conducted in Tanzania by searching Google Scholar, PubMed, and the websites of the Tanzania Ministry of Health and the World Health Organization for articles written in English and published from January 2012 to March 2021 using relevant search terms. Additionally, we reviewed applicable guidelines, plans, and reports from the Tanzanian Ministry of Health.

Results: We reviewed 10 articles on AMR in Tanzania, where studies were conducted at hospitals in seven of Tanzania’s 26 regions between 2012 and 2019. Nine AMR sentinel sites had been established, and there was suitable and clear coordination under ‘One Health’. However, sharing of surveillance data between sectors had yet to be strengthened. Most studies documented high resistance rates of Gram-negative bacteria to third-generation cephalosporins. There were few laboratory staff who were well trained on AMR.

Conclusion: Important progress has been made in establishing a useful, reliable AMR surveillance system. Challenges include a need to develop, implement and build investment case studies for the sustainability of AMR surveillance in Tanzania and ensure proper use of third-generation cephalosporins.

What this study adds: This article adds to the knowledge base of AMR trends in Tanzania and progress made in the implementation of AMR surveillance in human health sector as a contribution to the global AMR initiatives to reduce AMR burden worldwide. It has highlighted key gaps that need policy and implementation level attention.


Keywords

surveillance; antimicrobial resistance; COVID-19; One Health; Tanzania; Africa

Sustainable Development Goal

Goal 3: Good health and well-being

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